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image of prof Jelena Vuckovic
May 06, 2020 |
Professor Jelena Vučković announced as the CLEO 2020 James P. Gordon Memorial SpeakerJelena is the Jensen Huang Professor in Global Leadership in the School of Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and by courtesy of Applied Physics. She leads the Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab, and is a director of Q-FARM, Stanford-SLAC Quantum Science and Engineering Initiative. 
 
Jelena's research focuses on studying solid-state quantum emitters, such as quantum dots and defect centers in diamond, and their interactions with light. Her team is transforming conventional nanophotonics with the concept of inverse design, by designing arbitrary optical devices from scratch using computer algorithms with little to no human input. These efforts aim to enable a wide variety of technologies ranging from silicon photonics to quantum computing.

The Optical Society (OSA) Foundation memorial speakership pays tribute to Dr. James P. Gordon for his numerous high-impact contributions to quantum electronics and photonics, including the demonstration of the maser. 

CLEO 2020 is an all-virtual web conference this year. All are invited to view Dr. Vučković's talk and ask questions remotely. There is no fee for CLEO attendees, simply register for online participation. You can also watch previous talks from Gordon speakers by visiting osa.org/Gordon.

Jelena’s talk will be on 11 May 2020 at 2pm PDT.
image of accelerator section, magnified 25K

Scientists at Stanford and SLAC have created a silicon chip that can accelerate electrons using an infrared laser to deliver, in less than a hair’s width, the sort of energy boost that takes microwaves many feet.

professor Jelena Vučković
December 10, 2019 | Read full IET Press Release

Professor Jelena Vučković has been awarded the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) A F Harvey Engineering Research Prize. She will develop an on-chip integrated pulsed laser, which will revolutionize photonic technology and the applications that require these lasers, such as medicine, optical communications, quantum computing and self-driving cars.

Illustration by Sarah Rieke

Just beyond the horizon of practicality, researchers are trying to develop a new generation of chips that would control photons as reliably as today’s chips control electrons. Jelena Vuckovic has already devoted some 20 years to this pursuit for a simple reason: Photonic chips could become the basis for light-based quantum computers that could, in theory, break codes and solve certain types of problems beyond the capabilities of any electronic computer.

In recent months the Stanford electrical engineer has created a prototype photonic chip made of diamond. Now, however, in experiments described in Nature Photonics, she and her team demonstrate how to make a light-based chip from a material nearly as hard as diamond but far less exotic — silicon carbide.

"These are early stage but promising results with a material that is already familiar to industry," Vuckovic said.

October 01, 2019 |

Q-FARM is soliciting proposals for topical workshops in any area of quantum science and engineering. Interested organizers should submit a one page proposal with a tentative budget, timeline, and speakers to qfarm-excom@lists.stanford.edu

Postdocs are welcome to submit workshop proposals. Please be sure to include a letter from one or more faculty endorsing your proposal.

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