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Q-FARM presents "Quantum probes of two-dimensional materials"

Event date: 
Wednesday, May 5, 2021 - 12:00 pm
Speaker: 
Javier Sanchez-Yamagishi (UC Irvine)
Abstract: 

Spin qubits based on diamond NV centers can detect tiny magnetic fields; thin two-dimensional materials produce tiny magnetic fields.  Do they make a good match?  I will discuss two works that explored how NV magnetometry can uniquely probe the spins and currents in crystals that are one-atom thick.  

Outline: 

  • How we discovered, via local magnetic noise measurements, that graphene electrons at high bias undergo cherenkov radiation of phonons

  • How we performed the first NMR measurement on a single-atom thick crystal. 

  • Some thoughts and outlook on the benefits and challenges of using spin qubits to measure condensed matter systems. 

  • Preview of UC Irvine work on nanomanipulation of 2d material heterostructures

References:

“Electron-phonon instability in graphene revealed by global and local noise probes”

T. I. Andersen*, B. L. Dwyer*, J. D. Sanchez-Yamagishi*, J. F. Rodriguez-Nieva, K. Agarwal, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, E. A. Demler, P. Kim, H. Park, M. D. Lukin

Science 364 ,6436 (2019)   *equal contribution


“Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of an atomically thin material using a single-spin qubit”

I. Lovchinsky, J. D. Sanchez-Yamagishi, E. K. Urbach, S. Choi, S. Fang, T. Andersen, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, A. Bylinskii, E. Kaxiras, P. Kim, H. Park, and M. D. Lukin

Science 355, 6324 (2017)

Bio: 

Javier Sanchez-Yamagishi is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of California, Irvine (since 2018).  His lab studies quantum electronic transport in 2D and topological materials with an emphasis on developing fabrication and measurement techniques.  Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Quantum Optics Center where he explored the application of spin qubits as nanoscale magnetometers for 2D materials.  For his PhD work at MIT, he studied the electronic properties of twisted graphene heterostructures.